Friday, May 26, 2017

Guides for Glaciers

Climate change is making mountains more dangerous and threatening the prosperity of the guiding profession. This spring a historic mass of ice broke off from Colfax Peak, sweeping across the standard ascent route for Washington State's Mount Baker climb.
Photo: Kel Rossiter

Recently, Guides for Glaciers (G4G) was established, with a mission to address the issues of the changing mountain environment and its impacts on the guiding profession. G4G intends to mount an educational campaign to bring together common stakeholders in order to influence public policy and preserve the longevity and economic sustenance of the mountain guiding profession globally. The longevity of the entire guiding profession hinges on guides’ ability to advocate for climate change policy and preserve our mountain environments well into the future.

Friday, May 19, 2017

Splitboarding Corn in the Tetons


When it comes to split board (or ski) mountaineering, there is nowhere else I’d rather be when April and May roll around then the Tetons. Sure, there are many quintessential places to sharpen your teeth, but I’m totally enamored by the nooks and crannies my backyard offers every spring. While the valley below is thawing out, the Tetons rise between 10-13,000 feet and hold snow well into June during a heavy winter season. It's the perfect time to harvest corn and explore the deeper reaches of the range while many have tired of skiing.

Sunrise. Mt Saint John front and center with Rockchuck Peak and Mt Moran to the right.

Friday, April 21, 2017

More Bouldering in the Sierras

David climbing Saigon Direct (V9). Dave Vuono photo.
We've lived in the Sierras for almost two years now. Needless to say, in addition to climbing near our new home of Reno, we continue to spend as much time as possible in Bishop and Yosemite.

Friday, March 24, 2017

The Lloyd Project

Recently we were psyched to turn Instagram control over to Steve Lloyd.  He's one of our Utah based athletes and also an incredibly talented photographer.  Here's a recap from the takeover: 
 
 


Friday, March 17, 2017

Winter Climbing in Cuenca, Spain

Classic arête climbing on Cabe Esperar (8a) at Sombretivo.
Cuenca is a small city in central Spain, just two hours east of Madrid. The old town is perched on a cliff-lined plateau and is famous for Les Casas Colgadas, hanging houses built into the sheer rock walls that snake around the outer perimeter. Due to its abundance of historical attractions, Cuenca has been declared a UNSECO World Heritage Site and draws countless tourists every year, but the river gorges that surround the city are a major site for rock climbing, one of the most important in this part of Spain. But despite its quality climbing, visits from international climbers remain relatively rare, likely because Cuenca retains an old-school flavour, one where technique often trumps brute strength and tufas are practically non-existent. Regardless, the plentiful sunny aspects piqued our curiosity and we decided to dive in and book a mid-winter trip.

Saturday, March 11, 2017

What's in your backcountry pack?

Wanted to share a nice write up from Alexa Hohenberg (www.stillstoked.com).  She offers a detailed breakdown of what's in her backcountry pack and put together a cool video snapshot to showcase everything.




Alexa is a professional snowboarder, photographer and backcountry snowboard guide.